1. Inquiry Learning through Librarian-Teacher Partnerships by Violet Harada and Joan M. Yoshina

  • While I did not get a chance to actually look through this book, I previewed it on Amazon and thought that it looked very well designed. It has all the expected things in a book, a table of contents, an index, etc but I also liked that it had profiles of school projects which I assume to mean they outline what the project entailed.

  • This will be helpful if I need to try and advocate implementing inquiry-based learning or (more likely) it will help me catch up to where everyone else is as far as knowing about inquiry.

  • I found this book when reading the article "Moving from Rote to Inquiry: Creating Learning That Counts" by Harada and Yoshina which was in my copy of School Library Management.

  • I really don't feel like I should judge the strengths of something I haven't read yet but by looking at the above mentioned article, I really don't think that I would find many weaknesses in the book. In the article they do a nice job of keeping everything very simplified and the figures they use are nice summaries of the inquiry process.

Harada, Violet, and Joan M. Yoshina. Inquiry Learning through Librarian-Teacher Partnerships. Worthington, OH: Linworth Publishing Inc., 2004. Print


2. "Tips for New Librarians" by Sue Howard

  • This tool is exactly what the title implies; tips for new librarians.

  • This will be helpful to me in the future when I get my first job managing a library. Even if I don't get a job in a school media center, plenty of these tips could apply to other jobs.

  • I found this in my copy of School Library Management when I was looking for articles for this project.

  • It's a good article because it has a lot of things that you can do to position yourself as an important member of the school community but it leaves out the negative situations you may run into as a new librarian and what strategies you could use to go around those roadblocks which I think would've been helpful.

Howard, Sue. "Tips for New Librarians." School Library Management, Sixth Edition. Eds. Judi Repman and Gail K. Dickinson. Columbus: Linworth Publishing Inc., 2007. 4. Print.


3. "A Tale of Two Libraries: School and Public Librarians Working Together" by Julie Scordato

  • This is a short article meant to encourage the collaboration between media specialists and public librarians.

  • I think this is helpful because it's a reminder that public librarians have a lot to offer to a school community as well as the greater community so it would be a good idea to take advantage of their services.

  • I found this in my copy of School Library Management when I was looking for articles for this project.

  • It's a strong article because it brings up valid points about public librarians being able to help teach about researching databases and how a public library is a place that students use after school is over either for the day or for the rest of their lives and it's a good thing to learn early on that the public library has just as many resources as a school library.

Scordato, Julie. "A Tale of Two Libraries: School and Public Librarians Working Together." School Library Management, Sixth Edition. Eds. Judi Repman and Gail K. Dickinson. Columbus: Linworth Publishing Inc., 2007. 68-68. Print.


4. "Authentic Assessment in the Classroom...and the Library Media Center" by Jon Mueller

  • This article is basically a summary of what Mueller has created in his website, the Authentic Assessment Toolbox. He discusses what authentic assessment means and how a school librarian can have a role in this process along with the teachers.

  • This will be helpful when developing assessments when teaching and it also gave me the idea to inform teachers of things students should be learning.

  • I found this in my copy of School Library Management when I was looking for articles for this project.

  • It's a strong article because Mueller has done tons a research to back up his claim and he doesn't just say this is what you should do somehow but he gives you a whole website of helpful ideas.

Mueller, Jon. "Authentic Assessment in the Classroom...and the Library Media Center." School Library Management, Sixth Edition. Eds. Judi Repman and Gail K. Dickinson. Columbus: Linworth Publishing Inc., 2007. 75-78. Print.


5. Reading Ladders by Teri S. Lesesene
  • About her book Lesesene wrote:
Many of us are searching continually for that just-right book for each and every one of our students. It is my hope to help you find those books. More importantly, I hope to help you guide students to the next great book and the one after that. That is the purpose of Reading Ladders. Because it is not sufficient to find just one book for each reader. (heinemann.com)

  • This tool will be helpful when try to create a reading program that helps students develop into lifelong readers.

  • I found this on LM_Net from post made by Naomi Bates on March 24th.

  • This book is very intriguing. It is a discussion of creating lifelong readers and the strategies that can be used to mold them. I have not read it yet but this is something I would definitely consider an asset on my bookshelf for developing a reading advocacy strategy.

Lesesene, Teri S. Reading Ladders: Leading Students from Where They Are to Where We'd Like Them to Be. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2010. Print.